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16 December, 13:30

Which example is correct, according to the U. S. Constitution? A) Congress approves a bill and it becomes law. B) A bill can become a law before it is presented to the president. C) The president must be presented a bill before it can become a law. D) A bill can pass the House, but not the Senate, and still become a law.

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  1. 16 December, 14:15
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    The answer is C) The president must be presented a bill before it can become a law.

    According to section 7 of Article I of the U. S. Constitution, the overall process to pass a bill is the following:

    First, a new proposed bill has to be passed by both the House of Representatives and the Senate by a majority of votes. After this, the bill must be presented to the President. The President will have the option to approve the bill or use a veto. If he or she signs the bill, the law is enacted. But if it's rejected, the bill will be returned to the Congress.

    Once in Congress again, both houses have the chance to reconsider the law and vote on it to override the presidential veto. The law will only be finally passed if it is approved by the two-thirds majority votes requirement, regardless of the presidential signature.

    In conclusion, whenever the Congress proposes and voted on a bill, it always has to be presented to the President.
  2. 16 December, 14:37
    0
    The correct example is the C: The president must be presented a bill before it can become a law. After being passed by both houses of Congress, the House and the Senate, the bill is sent to the President for his signature, and only then it becomes a law. If the President rejects the bill (an action that is called a veto), the bill returns to Congress to be voted again. If a two-thirds majority passes the bill, the President's signature is not required and the bill becomes a law.
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