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17 December, 06:41

Consider the reaction between TiO2 and C:

TiO2 (s) + 2C (s) → Ti (s) + CO (g)

A reaction vessel initially contains 10.0g each of the reactants. Calculate the masses of TiO2, C, Ti, and CO that will be in the reaction vessel after the reactants have reacted as much as possible

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  1. 17 December, 08:39
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    TiO2 = Nothing ledt

    C = 7g

    Ti = 5.98g

    CO = 3.5g

    Explanation:

    TiO2 (s) + 2C (s) → Ti (s) + CO (g)

    Initial reactant masses of 10g

    This is a limiting reactant problem. We have to find the limiting reactant; this is the reactant that determines the amount of product formed.

    From the stoichiometry of the reaction;

    1 mol of TiO2 reacts completely with 2 moles of C

    Converting the starting masses to molres, we have;

    Moles = mass / molar mass

    For TiO2

    Moles = 10g / 79.866 g/mol = 0.125 moles

    For C

    Moles = 10g / 12g/mol = 0.8333 moles

    Time to find the limiting reactant;

    If all the 0.125 moles of TiO2 were used, it would require 2 * 0.125 = 0.250 moles of C. But we have 0.833 moles of C. This means C is in excess, hence TiO2 is our limiting reactant.

    All of TiO2 would be used up.

    Moles left of C = 0.8333 - 0.250 moles = 0.58333

    Mass left = Moles * Molar mass = 0.5833 * 12 = 6.99 = 7g

    Mass of Ti and Co formed;

    Moles formed is 0.125 moles.

    Mass of Ti = Moles * Molar mass = 0.125 * 47.867 = 5.98 g

    Mass of CO = Moles * Molar mass = 0.125 * 28 = 3.5g
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