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10 June, 22:17

Read this excerpt from "The TRape of the Lock" by Alexander Pope. Rephrase Pope's words to clarify the meaning of each line.

You need not rewrite every word, but your version should make the meaning of the original text clear.

What dire offense from amorous causes springs,

What mighty contests rise from trivial things,

I sing - This verse to Caryll, Muse! is due:

This, even Belinda may vouchsafe to view:

Slight is the subject, but not so the praise,

If She inspires, and He approves my lays.

Say what strange motive, Goddess! could compel

A well-bred Lord t' assault a gentle Belle?

O say what stranger cause, yet unexplored,

Could make a gentle Belle reject a Lord?

In tasks so bold, can little men engage,

And in soft bosoms dwells such mighty rage?

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Answers (2)
  1. 10 June, 22:47
    0
    Answer from Plato:

    What terrible offence can result from romantic pursuits,

    What great fights can arise from trivial things,

    I sing-this poem for Caryll, Muse is needed:

    Even Belinda can do me the favor of reading this verse

    The subject of the poem is trivial, but the praise could be great

    If she (Belinda) inspires and he (Caryll) approves my poem.

    Tell me, what strange motive could compel

    a well bred Lord (aristocrat or a gentleman) to assault a gentle girl?

    Tell me, what even stranger cause, as yet unheard of,

    could compel a gentle girl to reject a Lord?

    Small men can undertake such bold actions

    And soft-hearted women can hold so much anger?

    Summarized answer:

    What terrible offence can result from romantic pursuits, What great fights can arise from trivial things, I sing-this poem for Caryll, Muse is needed: Even Belinda can do me the favor of reading this verse The subject of the poem is trivial, but the praise could be great If she (Belinda) inspires and he (Caryll) approves my poem.
  2. 10 June, 22:49
    0
    What terrible offense can result from romantic pursuits,

    What great fights can arise from trivial things,

    I sing - this poem for Caryll, muse is needed:

    Even Belinda can do me the favor of reading this verse

    The subject of the poem is trivial, but the praise could be great

    If she (Belinda) inspires and he (Caryll) approves my poem.

    Tell me, what strange motive could compel a well bred Lord (aristocrat or a gentleman) to assault a gentle girl?

    Tell me, what even stranger cause, as yet unheard of,

    could compel a gentle girl to reject a Lord?

    Small men can undertake such bold actions

    And soft-hearted women can hold so much anger?
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