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1 April, 23:46

Why does the infographic refer to the years 1400 to 1775 as a "great age"?

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  1. 2 April, 01:24
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    The info graphic refers the years 1400 to 1775 as a "great age" as it was the period of witch hunting all over the world.

    Explanation:

    During the early 1400, many got into witchcraft and went into absurd extreme things, and this was put to an end from 1400 to 1775. The info graphic refers the years 1400 to 1775 as a "great age" as it was the period of witch hunting all over the world.

    From the country Russia to the Bermuda and from Scotland to the coastline Brazil, the witch hunt was fierce. Many were taken in pursuit, like nearly 100,000 were put under the legal action of the government and nearly 50,000 were sentenced to death as their punishment.

    Many were hanged both women and men and many were pressed to death cause of the disaster they did to many families especially in small families.
  2. 2 April, 01:30
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    The Info-graphic is referred to as the year 1400 to 1775 s great age since it was the age of witch hunts throughout the world.

    Explanation

    Ten years between 1400 to 1775 witnessed tremendous upheaval in world History with authorities taking tough and stringent measures against witch crafting. Europe, America, Scotland, and Brazil acted tough and with an iron rod approach against the certain malicious and societal practice. An estimated 100,000 people were persecuted for witchcraft and over 50,000 were sentenced to death for acts associated with witch crafting. The Salem witchcraft trials needs to be mentioned in this regard. The great age became all the greater with the arrival monarchs like James I who actively supported the clampdown on such persecution which was acts of witch crafting. The Pendle witches Trail of 1612 was another big event that occurred and at Lancashire as a result of which around ten people were given the death sentence for acts involving witch crafting or rather being witches themselves.
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